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Michael Anthony Moody, MD

Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Associate Professor in the Department of Immunology
Member of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute
Campus mail: 2 Genome Ct, MSRB II Room 3007, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: (919) 668-2551
Email address: tony.moody@duke.edu

Tony Moody, MD is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Infectious Diseases and Assistant Professor of Immunology at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Moody is the Director of the Laboratory of B cell Immunotechnology at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute (DHVI). Research in the Moody lab is focused on understanding the B cell responses during the earliest stages of HIV infection. The lab has become a resource for human phenotyping, flow characterization, staining and analysis at DHVI. Additionally, Dr. Moody serves as the Chief Medical Officer for DHVI and as the Director of the CHAVI DHVI Repository.

Human B cell Immunology

The Moody lab is studying changes to the B cell arm of the immune system during the earliest time points after HIV infection, as early as 17 days after transmission. This group recently elucidated the alterations to B cells that occur during acute/early HIV infection and have submitted a manuscript describing this work. The Moody lab is one of several working on the Antibodyome project--a project that seeks to understand the repertoire of antibodies produced in response to vaccination and infection. The lab continues to work on the development of new flow cytometric panels and reagents that can enhance the detection of B cell responses during the acute/early HIV infection.

In addition, the Moody lab has active projects looking at the response to influenza, syphilis, autoimmunity, and is interested in applying the technique to other disease processes.

Education and Training

  • Fellowship, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Pediatrics, Duke University, 2003 - 2006
  • Pediatric Chief Resident, Pediatrics, Emory University, 2002 - 2003
  • Pediatric Internship & Residency, Pediatrics, Emory University, 1999 - 2002
  • M.D., Duke University, 1999

Selected Grants and Awards

Publications

HAYNES, B. F., Y. YASUTOMI, J. V. TORRES, M. B. GARDNER, A. J. LANGLOIS, D. P. BOLOGNESI, T. J. MATTHEWS, et al. “USE OF SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES IN PRIMATES TO INDUCE HIGH-TITERED NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODIES AND MHC CLASS I-RESTRICTED CYTOTOXIC T-CELLS AGAINST AIDS RETROVIRUSES - AN HLA-BASED VACCINE STRATEGY.” Clinical Research 41, no. 2 (April 1, 1993): A261–A261.

Scholars@Duke

Haynes, B. F., Y. Yasutomi, J. V. Torres, M. B. Gardner, A. J. Langlios, D. P. Bolognesi, T. J. Matthews, R. M. Scearce, D. M. Jones, and M. A. Moody. “Use of synthetic peptides in primates to induce high-titered neutralizing antibodies and MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T cells against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome retroviruses: an HLA-based vaccine strategy..” Trans Assoc Am Physicians 106 (1993): 33–41.

Scholars@Duke

Seltzman, H. H., M. A. Moody, and M. K. Begum. “Allylic substitution/rearrangement of cannabinoids with trimethylsilyl bromide.” Tetrahedron Letters 33, no. 24 (June 9, 1992): 3443–46. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0040-4039(00)92658-3.

Full Text

ANTHONY, D. C., V. AMARNATH, G. R. SIMONS, M. B. STCLAIR, M. A. MOODY, and D. G. GRAHAM. “ACCUMULATION OF PYRROLE RESIDUES AS THE MOLECULAR-BASIS OF CUMULATIVE NEUROTOXIC DOSE OF 2,5-HEXANEDIONE.” Journal of Neuropathology and Experimental Neurology 47, no. 3 (May 1, 1988): 325–325.

Scholars@Duke

Genter St Clair, M. B., V. Amarnath, M. A. Moody, D. C. Anthony, C. W. Anderson, and D. G. Graham. “Pyrrole oxidation and protein cross-linking as necessary steps in the development of gamma-diketone neuropathy..” Chem Res Toxicol 1, no. 3 (May 1988): 179–85.

Scholars@Duke

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