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Newest data shows childhood obesity continues to increase

Monday, February 26, 2018
By Samiha Khanna
Asheley Skinner; Sarah Armstrong

DURHAM, N.C. -- Despite reports in recent years suggesting childhood obesity could be reaching a plateau in some groups, the big picture on obesity rates for children ages 2 to 19 remains unfavorable.

Three decades of rising childhood obesity continued their upward trend in 2016 according to a new analysis from Duke Health researchers. The findings, which appeared Feb. 26 in the journal Pediatrics, show 35.1 percent of children in the U.S. were overweight in 2016, a 4.7-percent increase compared to 2014.

“About four years ago, there was evidence of a decline in obesity in preschoolers,” said Asheley Cockrell Skinner, Ph.D., lead author and associate professor of population health sciences, who is also a member of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI). “It appears any decline that may have been detected by looking at different snapshots in time or different data sets has reversed course. The long-term trend is clearly that obesity in children of all ages is increasing.” 

The data are based on body-mass index (BMI) data for 3,340 children participating in the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2015-16, a large database updated every two years. Researchers examined data back to 1999 that includes 33,543 children.

The researchers identified notable spikes between 2014 and 2016 in obesity for preschool boys, which rose from 8.5 percent to 14.2 percent, and girls aged 16 to 19, whose rates of obesity jumped from 35.6 percent to 47.9 percent.

Boys and girls aged 16 to 19 had the highest rates of any age group in 2016, with 41.5 percent considered overweight, defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as having a BMI at or above the 85th percentile for age and sex. Among these 16-to-19-year-olds, 4.5 percent have Class III obesity, the highest of three categories defined by the CDC.

Both Class II and Class III are considered severe and are linked with greater risk of heart and metabolic health problems, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol.

Across all age groups, African-American and Hispanic children had higher rates of overweight and all levels of obesity, while Asian-American children had markedly lower rates. The most prominent trend since 1999 is the increase in all levels of overweight for Hispanic girls, and overweight and Class II obesity (BMI that is at least 120 percent above the 95th percentile for age and sex) among Hispanic males.

“Despite some previous reports, the obesity epidemic has not abated,” said senior author Sarah C. Armstrong, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics who is also a member of the DCRI. “This evidence is important in keeping the spotlight shined on programs to support healthy changes. Obesity is one of the most serious health challenges facing children and is a predictor for many other health problems. When we see that leveling off, we can become complacent -- we can’t afford to do that.”

Read the full press release