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Eric James Benner, PhD, MD

George W. Brumley, Jr. M.D Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
Campus mail: 2424 Erwin Road - Suite 504, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: (919) 668-1598
Email address: eric.benner@duke.edu

As a neonatologist, my research interests revolve around improving the survival and quality of life of high-risk neonates cared for in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. My primary interest is perinatal brain injuries impacting both full-term infants and those born prematurely.  One of the most common forms of perinatal brain injury involves damage to white matter (myelin). My laboratory has developed models of perinatal brain injury to investigate how the endogenous neural stem cell responds to myelin injury. Our hope is to develop innovative strategies to successfully redirect stem cells into the oligodendrocyte lineage and promote myelination after injury.  In order to successfully restore myelination after injury, we want to better understand the molecular mechanisms governing 2 important aspects of myelin development. 

First, we must understand the molecular signals that drive neural stem cells to differentiate into oligodendrocytes (oligodendrogenesis) and how brain injury impacts this process. This interest has led my laboratory to investigate intracellular and extracellular changes that occur in the neural stem cell niche following injuries that lead to white matter damage. 

Secondly, after stem cell commitment to the oligodendrocyte lineage has occurred, we must understand the ongoing signals from the neural environment that influence oligodendrocyte maturation. For this work, my laboratory has developed an innovative technology to remotely control ion channels non-invasively using magnetic fields. Using this technology, we are developing strategies to alter the activity of targeted neural circuits both in utero as well as postnatally to understand the impact of altered activity on myelin maturation. Members of my laboratory are also currently using this technology to understand how altered temperature-gated channel activity in utero may contribute to birth defects associated with maternal fevers. 

Education and Training

  • Neonatology Fellowship, Pediatrics, Duke University School of Medicine, 2009 - 2011
  • Pediatric Residency, Pediatrics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2006 - 2008
  • M.D., University of Nebraska College of Medicine, 2006
  • Ph.D., University of Nebraska Omaha, 2005

Publications

Benner, Eric J., Rebecca Banerjee, Ashley D. Reynolds, Simon Sherman, Vladimir M. Pisarev, Vladislav Tsiperson, Craig Nemachek, et al. “Nitrated alpha-synuclein immunity accelerates degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons..” Plos One 3, no. 1 (January 2, 2008). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0001376.

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Lee Mosley, R., E. J. Benner, I. Kadiu, M. Thomas, M. D. Boska, K. Hasan, C. Laurie, and H. E. Gendelman. “Neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.” Clinical Neuroscience Research 6, no. 5 (December 1, 2006): 261–81. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.006.

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Boska, Michael D., Travis B. Lewis, Christopher J. Destache, Eric J. Benner, Jay A. Nelson, Mariano Uberti, R Lee Mosley, and Howard E. Gendelman. “Quantitative 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging determines therapeutic immunization efficacy in an animal model of Parkinson's disease..” J Neurosci 25, no. 7 (February 16, 2005): 1691–1700. https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4364-04.2005.

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Benner, Eric J., R Lee Mosley, Chris J. Destache, Travis B. Lewis, Vernice Jackson-Lewis, Santhi Gorantla, Craig Nemachek, Steven R. Green, Serge Przedborski, and Howard E. Gendelman. “Therapeutic immunization protects dopaminergic neurons in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease..” Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101, no. 25 (June 22, 2004): 9435–40. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0400569101.

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Gendelman, H. E., C. J. Destache, M. L. Zelivyanskaya, J. A. Nelson, M. D. Boska, T. M. Biskup, M. K. McCarthy, et al. “Neuroimaging and proteomic tracking of neurodegeneration in MPTP-treated mice.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 991 (January 1, 2003): 319–21.

Scholars@Duke

Sharp, J. G., M. R. Bishop, B. Copple, T. C. Greiner, P. L. Iversen, J. D. Jackson, S. S. Joshi, et al. “Oligonucleotide enhanced cytotoxicity of Idarubicin for lymphoma cells..” Leuk Lymphoma 42, no. 3 (July 2001): 417–27. https://doi.org/10.3109/10428190109064599.

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Bagchi, D., S. S. Joshi, M. Bagchi, J. Balmoori, E. J. Benner, C. A. Kuszynski, and S. J. Stohs. “Cadmium- and chromium-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death in cultured human chronic myelogenous leukemic K562 cells, promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells, and normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells..” J Biochem Mol Toxicol 14, no. 1 (2000): 33–41.

Scholars@Duke

Joshi, S. S., C. A. Kuszynski, E. J. Benner, M. Bagchi, and D. Bagchi. “Amelioration of the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents by grape seed proanthocyanidin extract..” Antioxid Redox Signal 1, no. 4 (1999): 563–70. https://doi.org/10.1089/ars.1999.1.4-563.

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Joshi, S. S., E. J. Benner, J. Balmoori, and D. Bagchi. “Amelioration of cytotoxic effects of idarubicin and 4HC on Chang liver cells by a novel grape seed proanthocyanidin extract.” Faseb Journal 12, no. 5 (March 20, 1998).

Scholars@Duke

Joshi, S., D. Bagchi, C. Kuszvnski, E. J. Benner, M. Bagchi, and S. J. Stohs. “Cadmium and chromium induced oxidative stress and apoptopic cell death in cultured human chronic myelogenous leukemic k562 cells.” Faseb Journal 11, no. 9 (December 1, 1997).

Scholars@Duke

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